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Yesterday

Amber L.

Dear Jacqueline,

I would like to invest in some good quality brushes, in particular eyeshadow brushes and a contour/blush brush. I had previously been looking at the Sakura Collection by Chikuhodo but since I live in New Zealand, it is now out of my price range. The only eye shadow brushes I have are the Urban Decay brush that came with the Naked 2 palette, and the Mac 217. I would greatly appreciate it if they are available here on beautylish.

Thank you so much for your time!

Yesterday

Jacqueline H.

Hi Amber; Contour/Blush Brush: I would take a look at Billy B.'s Contour and Blush set. In this set you get everything you need to highlight/contour, apply blush, and you also get brush #6 which is great for laying down base shadow, blending and cleaning up and around the eye and nose area. Since you already have MAC's 217, for additional shadow brushes I recommend Billy B.'s #8-12. All are available on Beautylish.

Yesterday

Amber L.

Thank you so much for your reply! I have learnt so much from you over the last couple of years I have been here on beautylish, I greatly value your opinion.
Again, thank you so much for taking the time to reply to me!

Yesterday

Jacqueline H.

Thank you Amber, that means a lot. :) I think you'll like Billy's brushes; I know I do.

Yesterday

Amber C.

Yes

2 days ago

Nadia W.

Hi Jackie H! I have another question for you about brushes: What is the difference between brushes with white or black/brown hair--even if they are made from the same animal. I noticed that in the more expensive lines, the white brushes are more expensive. For instance, I was looking at the Hakudodo S line that you suggested. I really want to buy the S100 angled brush which is made with goat hair. You can purchase either brown or white, but the white is more expensive. Is there a difference or is it a matter of personal preference?

Yesterday

Jacqueline H.

Hi Nadia; I'll do my best to answer your questions point by point, and knowing me, I'll probably give you more information than you wanted.

What is the difference between brushes with white or black/brown hair--even if they are made from the same animal. I noticed that in the more expensive lines, the white brushes are more expensive.

In some cases, the only difference can be that the bristle is the same however; the other may have been dyed. Even though the bristle may come from the same animal, the quality, the region it was cut from and how it is cut effects the price. For example let's examine squirrel:

Squirrel in general really works well with powder products, and is usually utilized most often in blush brushes, shading brushes, shadow brushes, etc. etc. Why? Because squirrel bristle is neither elastic nor durable. That's why you'll see some type of synthetic bristle mixed in with the squirrel; it adds support so the brush has more spring. There are different types of squirrel bristle, and the type effects the cost:

1. Grey Squirrel; The most prized and softest bristle there is. It's hard to come by, and it has a bit more snap to it, and they provide the softest washes of color.

2. Blue Squirrel (Talayoutky): Expensive due to fairly short supply, and it just has one of the most pleasant textures to work with, and if you mix this bristle with goat, you get stronger color washes.

3. Canadian: The tips of the Canadian squirrel's bristle is delicate, easy to shape, and more elastic than blue.

4. Tree Squirrel: Very similar to weasel. It is rather rough and very very elastic.
You'll usually see this bristle used for shadow brushes and liquid based products.

5. Kazakhstan squirrel: This bristle equals expensive; you will pay through the nose for Kazakhstan. It is just as soft, if not softer than gray squirrel and it's good for applying powder only.

6. Pine Squirrel: Still a very soft bristle, but it's hard to bunch and you'll usually see this bristle in smudging brushes.

If dyed, most every one of the aforementioned bristle types can look the same; that's why it's best to know the intrinsic differences between these bristle types. Top quality natural bristle brushes will have first-cut or virgin hairs. This bristle is sheared from only the fine-tipped points of fur. Second-cut hairs will be blunter than and not as soft as first-cut bristle.

The same principles apply to goat bristle. Different types and cuts of goat bristle effect the price; the 'white' color of the bristle is inconsequential...You have to know what 'kind' of goat bristle it is; that's what drives the price. The most common goat bristle types you'll see are

1. Soikoho: Softer and even more delicate than hair than Sokoho. It is hard to find and quite rare and expensive.

2. Sokoho: Very long, thin, and soft. Great for finishing brushes, powder brushes shadow etc. etc.

3. Ototsuho: Nice and elastic. They pack color well. You'll usually see this bristle in blush brushes.

4. Yano: Very water-resistant and suitable for liquid-based products. You'll see this bristle in foundation brushes.

5. Saichoho: Similar to Sokoho but rougher. Another great bristle that allows the user to pack a whole lot of color.

With these brushes you are not only paying for the quality of the bristle, you are paying for how the brush is made. These making of these types of fudes' can only be performed by experienced and skilled workers; as their observation and touch is the ONLY thing that decides on the quality of each brush. Any hair that is loose, pointing a slightly different way, feels odd or different or is any other than perfect, will be combed out with a small hansashi tool. Doing this by hand requires a lot of time, but is the only way to create a perfect brush. The tips of most mass produced brushes are trimmed into shape, resulting in skin-irritation or an uncomfortable feel due to the cross-section of the (cut) hairs. The master brush maker has to watch and feel the changes to avoid altering the brush’s shape. It is this manipulation that ultimately determines the quality of the finished brush, so it is a step that requires both intuition and attention to detail; it takes six people just to get to a tied bunch of hairs. In total, each brush passes through the hands of about 10 or 12 people, and that is what you are paying for.

I really want to buy the S100 angled brush which is made with goat hair. You can purchase either brown or white, but the white is more expensive. Is there a difference or is it a matter of personal preference?

Here's where it gets interesting... As you have seen, there are several different series of Hakuhodo... What's the difference? The quality and (in general) the shapes are the same across most every series, but the handles differ, which is why the S100 and Kokutan series are much more expensive. They intermingle different brush heads with different handles...Example..The J series primarily focuses on using white goat hair, G series on black goat hair, and the two are some of the newer series in their their series. You like the white SJ100? That same exact brush head is on the J100, it just has a different handle... it doesn't have Hakuhodo's signature S100 Vermilion coloring and 18k gold plate, but it's the same brush head. See what I mean?

Now, the Hakuhodo white goat angled finishing brush brush (SJ100 ) was not part of the original series offerings. It wasn't added till fairly recently, and from what I know, once this brush sells out they may not replenish it because they made it as a 'test' brush of sorts for a few makeup shows when they were having manufacturing delays on the original black goat S100. Both the SJ100 and the S100 are the same brush but the reason the SJ100 one costs more? 2 reasons:

1. It is a denser brush.
2. It is an oddball brush that exists in the traditional lineup, and you hardly ever see Hakuhodo do that. That being said, if I were you, I would get the white SJ100 because it may never come back once it sells out, and you will own a 'limited edition' brush of sorts. Hope this helped.

Yesterday

Nadia W.

Jackie, I don't know what to say other than you're completely amazing! Wow! I had NO idea that there was so much to know and understand about Japanese brushes. Thank you. I've always wanted to go to school to formally learn about this incredible art form and now I know I need to do so. I SO appreciate your insights. You're the best. PS: I'm saving your response in my separate "Dr. Jackie H." folder. Have a great weekend. AND...I'm getting the brush. Nadia.

Yesterday

Jacqueline H.

Anytime Nadia. Yes, makeup brushes are a passion of mine; especially Japanese makeup brushes. When you do get that SJ100 in the mail, and you open the Hakuhodo pink box...be prepared to just stare at the brush for a minute or so. It's such a pretty brush, you almost don't want to take it out of the box. Enjoy, and please let me know what you think of the brush. :)

Yesterday

Nadia W.

Jackie, I can't wait! I will definitely let you know. I will have a completely different way to engage in the experience based on your feedback! Incidentally, I read an older review of the Kevyn Aucoin set you purchased some time ago and had to laugh out loud!

Yesterday

Jacqueline H.

I know... lol. I loose my mind and my wallet when it comes to good makeup brushes; I have a very hard time controlling myself. You'll will be happy to know that I haven't completely lost my mind; I am not going to purchase the Beautylish/Chikuhodo Sakura Collection brushes. Baby steps. :)

Yesterday

Nadia W.

Uh oh...ahem. Well, about that Beautylish*Chikuhodo Sakura Collection...The folks at Beautylish make you feel so daggone special that it's hard to say, 'No'. I had no self control. They look amazing and given the cost of the Chikuhodo MK and Z lines, I thought the Sakura collection was a bargin. At least you can justify your purchases given what you do everyday; you're a professional. There is no way I can rationalize this purchase! I am such the amateur make up addict. The only thing I'm qualified to do is start a support group for cosmetics addicts like myself! I put the Sakura brushes on a card--I'll just cut out a meal or two the next couple of weeks. I need to drop a few pounds anyway! Lol.

Yesterday

Jacqueline H.

Nadia, I spend so much money on brushes that even I can't justify it. I already have the MK II brush and after looking at the shapes of the heads of the new Sakura brushes, I already have brushes with nearly identical, or very very similar shapes, so why spend more money. Chikuhodo brushes are beautiful, and I'm sure you'll love them. :) The price Beautylish is selling them for is actually a very good deal, so you are smart for snatching them in pre-order. I got that pre-order text message and all I can say is this: I felt like a caged lion looking at a huge prime rib roast dangling right in front of the cage; not fun. ;)

Thanks for the heads up on the NIA24. My knowledge of skin care products stops at prepping the skin to make the makeup lay right. I have never heard of this brand before and I think I'm going to give it a go. :)

Yesterday

Nadia W.

Jackie you are HILARIOUS! I love the caged lion analogy; I can so relate. I really do need to stop this is getting ridiculous. I don't know how to use half the stuff I have. Hence, I'll be reading some of the books you suggested.

I'm so glad you're interested in trying the NIA 24 products. The NIA 24 line isn't so mainstream as they are typically sold at high end spas or 'medi' spas. It comes highly recommended by dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons and they have won some high profile awards -- Allure etc. I would take a look at the website so you can read about the science behind the product. The before and after pics are also quite convincing. I will caution you, it is a bit of an investment -- just breathe. You may want to purchase the starter kit first to see how you like the products before taking the plunge. (smile) It's worth it. I promise. Best, Nadia

17 hours ago

Jacqueline H.

I've been told that I'm far more humorous than I look. ;) I went to the website you purchase your NIA 24 products from and I went with the Spring Radiance Kit, and I'm excited to try the products. If I like the results, I'll take the plunge. I'll just cut down on my Krispy Kreme doughnut intake. I know I need to drop a few pounds. :)

5 days ago

Reny J.

Hi Jackie!! Is that true you don't need a primer with the new mac foundation?? I have very oily skin. I still don't need one? I feel like that hourglass primer is my crutch lol. I have learned so many tips fr reading things you and alma have posted in the last 2and half years😃

5 days ago

Jacqueline H.

Thanks Reny, we try. :) You know...even with oily skin, this foundation really adheres well. If anything, I would just make sure your skin is prepped well and use a good oil control moisturizer. This foundation really doesn't need a whole lot of Spackle/Prep in order to function as intended. Of course, every skin type has variants... try it with and without your primer and see what works best for you. Overall, I think this is a really solid solid foundation. :)

6 days ago

Sandra C.

Yassssssssssss! thanks so much(:

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Jacqueline H.

Shake -N- Bake....That Just Happened!

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About Me

Professional Makeup Artist
Era/Period/Stage and Theater Design Consultant.

Graduate of Cinema Makeup School Specializing in:

Makeup for Film and Television
SFX Makeup
Period Makeup
Stage/Theater Makeup
Corrective Makeup
Hi-Fashion Photographic Print Makeup
Runway/Avant-garde Makeup
Fantasy Makeup
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I'm always happy to help when and where I can. Feel free to ask all the questions you want. I sincerely do the best I can to answer all questions posed on my profile; however, please keep this in mind, the simple act of saying 'thank you' is a most appreciated demonstration of common courtesy. :)




"Today I see beauty everywhere I go, in every face I see, in every single soul." Kevyn Aucoin
Eye Color: Blue
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Undertone: Neutral
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Hair Color: Brown

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